How long does a DUI last in your record? [All states]

In addition to all the legal problems that can arise from a DUI, your driving record will also be affected. As a result, you will have to take on some inconveniences such as the presentation of the SR-22, increases in insurance premiums and difficulties at work. But, How long does a DUI last in your record? A DUI will remain in your driving record for five to ten years in most states. Depending on where you live, you may even have it in your lifelong driving record. We will explain this in detail later.

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📰 Contents
  1. What is a DUI?
  2. How long does a DUI last in your record?
  3. How long does a DUI record last?
  4. Impact of a DUI on your driving record
  5. If I get a DUI in one state, will it show up on my driving record in another state?
  6. Is it possible to delete a DUI record?
  7. How to delete a DUI from my record?
  8. Can I repair the documents if I have a DUI?

What is a DUI?

DUI is short for "driving under the influence". (driving under the influence of alcohol). This term is used in the accusations of drunk driving, that is, driving under the influence of substances.

DUI laws in the United States prohibit drivers from driving a vehicle if the amount of alcohol in the blood is 0.08% or higher. DUI is punishable by fines, license suspension and / or imprisonment, depending on the circumstances and the place where the crime occurs.

We have already made it clear what a DUI is in the USA, now let's see how long it will remain in your driving record.

How long does a DUI last in your record?

Beyond your driving record, a DUI will put a black mark on your criminal record. This can lead to expensive fines and imprisonment. But in this case there is a big difference between a criminal record and a driving record. In most states, a DUI remains on your criminal record for life unless the charge is reduced, deferred, cleared, or sealed.

In most states, a DUI will remain in your driving record for five to ten years, and in others it will be for life. Each state handles DUIs differently, but you should know that:

  • Most states use a point system to track your driving. When you commit a traffic violation, the DMV status put points on the driving license. If you accumulate enough points, your license can be suspended.
  • Insurance companies check the points on your driver's license when pricing your insurance policy. More points on the license lead to higher insurance rates.
  • Of the states that use a points system, some award points for DUI, while others opt for tougher penalties. Instead of points, these states can automatically suspend your license or fine you for a DUI.
  • The number of license points awarded for a DUI varies by state. How long those points remain on a license also depends on where you live. In some states, it is a set number of years. In other states, you can deduct points every year without traffic violations.

The table below outlines how long a DUI stays on a driving record in each state. It also covers the number of license points assigned for DUI and how long those points remain on a license. In states with tougher penalties, drivers generally face automatic license suspension.

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How long does a DUI record last?

The table below outlines how long a DUI stays on a driving record in each state. It also covers the number of license points assigned for DUI and how long those points remain on a license. In states with tougher penalties, drivers generally face automatic license suspension.

How long does a DUI last in your record (all states)
Condition Recorded during: Points stitch duration
Alabama 5 years 6 points 2 years
Alaska Forever 10 points 2 points every 2 years
Arizona 5 years 8 points 3 years
Arkansas 5 years 14 points 3 years
California 10 years 2 points 13 years
Colorado 10 years 8 points 2 years
Connecticut 10 years 3 points 2 years
Delaware 5 years extra penalties N / A
Florida 75 years old extra penalties 3 years
Georgia 10 years extra penalties 2 years
Hawaii 5 years no points system N / A
Idaho Forever extra penalties 3 years
Illinois Forever no points system N / A
Indiana Forever 8 points 2 years
Iowa 12 years no points system N / A
Kansas Forever no points system N / A
Kentucky 5 years extra penalties 2 years
Louisiana 10 years no points system N / A
Maine Forever extra penalties 1 years
Maryland 5 years 12 points 3 years
Massachusetts 10 years 5 points 6 years
Michigan 7 years 6 points 2 years
Minnesota 10 years no points system N / A
Mississippi 5 years no points system N / A
Missouri 10 years 8 points 1.5 years
Mountain 5 years 10 points 3 years
Nebraska 12 years 6 points 2 years
Nevada 7 years extra penalties 1 years
New Hampshire 10 years 6 points 3 years
New Jersey 10 years extra penalties N / A
New Mexico 55 years old extra penalties 1 years
New York 15 years extra penalties 1.5 years
North Carolina 7 years extra penalties 3 years
North Dakota 7 years extra penalties 3 years
Ohio Forever 6 points 3 years
Oklahoma 10 years extra penalties 3 years
Oregon Forever no points system N / A
Pennsylvania 10 years extra penalties 3 discount points per year
Rhode Island 5 years no points system N / A
South Carolina 10 years extra penalties 2 years
South Dakota 10 years 10 points Varies
Tennessee Forever extra penalties 2 years
Texas Forever 2 points 3 years
Utah 10 years extra penalties 2 years
Vermont Forever extra penalties 2 years
Virginia 11 years extra penalties 2 years
Washington 15 years no points system N / A
West Virginia 10 years extra penalties 2 years
Wisconsin 10 years 6 points 5 years
Wyoming 10 years no points system N / A

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Impact of a DUI on your driving record

A DUI on your driving record can get you in trouble, including:

  • Higher insurance rates
  • Work difficulties if your job involves driving
  • suspension of the license

Your driving record plays an important role in determining the price of your insurance policy. as it is one of the first things insurers consider when assessing your level of risk. High-risk drivers often pay a lot more for auto insurance than low-risk drivers.

This means that if your driving record is littered with tickets, accidents, or DUI, your insurance rates could go up. Insurers often take the last three to five years of your driving record into consideration when calculating a premium. If multiple violations accumulate during that period, the company may even cancel coverage.

Depending on your career an irregular driving record can impact your job opportunities. The requirements for commercial driving licenses include having a clean driving record.

Long last, If your driving record contains too many citations or violations, your license may be suspended. The license suspension threshold varies by state. In some states, a DUI warrants automatic suspension.

If your license is suspended, you may need to present an SR-22 or FR-44 to reinstate it. Form SR-22 is required to verify that you meet the minimum liability insurance coverage requirements. It is also known as the Certificate of Financial Responsibility, or FR-44, in the states of Virginia and Florida.

SR-22 requirements generally last three years. Many insurers will charge you a flat fee for completing forms during this period. DMVs often charge a filing fee as well. This is all in addition to the license restoration fees. Therefore, an SR-22 can be expensive.

If I get a DUI in one state, will it show up on my driving record in another state?

Yes, most states report violations from previous states. It depends on the laws of your new state, but as a general rule a DUI will appear on any driving record. This is in the case of getting an out of state DUI or moving to a new state with a DUI in your record.

If you get a DUI while visiting another state, it will likely be shared with your state's DMV through what is known as a "driver's license agreement". All states participate except Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee and Wisconsin. But even these states often have informal arrangements with other states to exchange driver information.

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Is it possible to delete a DUI record?

Typically, a DUI cannot be removed from the driving record. Therefore, there is no more waiting until the time required by state law expires. Take a look at the table we've included above to see how long a DUI will last on your driving record.

How to delete a DUI from my record?

A DUI cannot be erased from the driving record. However, you should seek legal assistance. DUI laws are complex and the chances of beating a DUI without the help of a lawyer are slim. People who seek help from a specialist are more likely to have a DUI charge reduction.

A lawyer can help you beat a criminal charge, but deleting or wiping a DUI from your criminal record doesn't mean it's no longer in your driving file.

Regardless of the details of your situation, you should consult a lawyer who has experience in handling DUI cases. They can give you some tips and help you mitigate the damage DUI has done.

Can I repair the documents if I have a DUI?

Yes, you can repair documents that have a DUI. However, this will depend on your particular case, i.e. whether you have documents or are undocumented. For example, if you are resident you are not in danger of deportation if you have a standard DUI. On the other hand, if you are undocumented, you could risk expulsion. But we repeat, it will all depend on your situation. Therefore, we recommend that you consult your case with an immigration attorney.

If you want to discover other articles similar to How long does a DUI last in your record? [All states], you can visit the Last News category.

Nathan Hamilton

Nathan Hamilton

Nathan is a car enthusiast and industry professional with decades of combined experience in the automotive sector. Along with his team of writers and researchers, all passionate about automobiles, he is committed to delivering reliable and relevant content that ranges from detailed insurance guides to maintenance tips and much more.

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